Month: January 2015

Designer of the week: Edward Benguiat

Benguiat

Benguiat Portrait

Typographer Biography: Edward Benguiat

Edward Benguiat, born on October 27, 1927, is a designer who has created many well known typographical designs. Born in Brooklyn, New York, his father worked at Bloomingdale’s as a display director and at the age of 9, began to learn the tools of the trade from his father. Before WWII, he began an interest in music and percussion will led to a love of Jazz. He enlisted in the Army during WWII and afterwords started his music career and gained popularity as a Progressive Jazz Musician. Edward later would say how graphic design and typography is comparable to the rhythm of music composition (Halperin, 2000). With his strong music background, he then used his GI Bill and enrolled into the Workshop School of Advertising Art. He became Paul Standards’ understudy. Edward would go on to have a successful career as a Designer and Art Director. He partnered with Ed Ronthaler and created Photo-lettering Inc.

Career Highlights

In 1953 he was an associate director of Esquire magazine. In 1962 he would go on to start is own New York design studio. Edward has been very influential in the typography world. He helped establish the international type face association, the first independent licensing company for type designers which aimed to market type design to the industry. This led to a growth in the type industry in the 1960’s. His first ITC Project was Souvenir. Condensed, and many more. Ed continues to create typefaces for ITC, including the recent Edwardian.

Ed created or re-designed many well known logos including Esquire, Mcalls, The New York Times, and The San Diego Tribune, among many others. He is still very active and design, and having been a prolific designer since the 1960’s he has seen the change and growth in the design industry. He has said that “Too many people think that they’ve got a Mac and they can draw a logo or a typeface. You have to learn to draw first. The computer won’t do it for you” (Halperin, 2000)

Edward received the Gold Medal of excellence from the New York Type Directors Club as well as the Frederick W. Goudy award. He currently does lectures around the world and since 1962, has been an instructor at The School of Visual Arts.

Typography

Edward is credited with the creation of over 600 typefaces (Strizver, 2006) He created the typefaces Tiffany, Benguiat, Benguiat Gothic, Korinna, Panache, Modern No. 216, Bookman, Caslon No. 225, Barcelona, and Avante Garde. ITC Souvenir is based on Souvenir by Morris Fuller Fenton which was originally a single weight typeface, Ed added additional weights and italics . It was redrawn by Benguiat in 1967 for the Photo-lettering Corporation. ITC Benguiat is a decorative serif typeface released in 1978 and is based the typefaces of the Art Nouveau period. He continues to work on typefaces for ITC and his more recent font is Edwardian Script.

 scriptpage

References

Strizver, I. (2006). Type rules!: The designer’s guide to professional typography (2nd ed.). Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley.

Font Designer – Edward Benguiat. (n.d.). Retrieved January 24, 2015, from http://www.linotype.com/1515/edwardbenguiat.html

Halperin, E. (2000, January 1). Edward Benguiat. Retrieved January 24, 2015, from http://adcglobal.org/hall-of-fame/edward-benguiat/

ITC Benguiat. (2015, January 1). Retrieved January 24, 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ITC_Benguiat

Souvenir (typeface). (n.d.). Retrieved January 24, 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souvenir_(typeface)

Ed Benguiat. (n.d.). Retrieved January 24, 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Benguiat

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Basic programming vocab for designers

As a designer, its not expected that you have a extensive and complete knowledge of programming but having a fundamental understanding of programming is helpful and even essential for those in web design. Here are some of the concepts that you will find in almost all programming languages.

Variables

Variables are used to store data and set values. Variables typically have an identifying name and value. (such as x = 3) This is similar to the concept of variables in math.

Arrays

Similar in concept to variables, arrays can hold many variables under a single name.

Syntax

The syntax of a programming language is the set of rules that govern the structure. Think of the syntax as the words and grammar of the language itself.

Conditional Statements

Conditional statements (sometimes called conditionals) are used to make decisions based on certain conditions. For example a conditional can allow JavaScript to perform an action if a variable is greater than or equal to “3”.

Loops

Loops repeat a defined set of code over and over. They are usually paired with conditions to ensure they don’t loop forever.

Functions

A function is a block of code that does something. For example, the prompt function displays a dialog box asking for user input.

A great way to learn some of these concepts is through Code Combat, which is controlled through writing simple code.

Visit CODE COMBAT to have fun learning basic code.

Demistifying Javascript

JavaScript is a programming language made for web browsers which was initially made for basic image display, text and data but in the 1990’s Netscape developed it into what you see today. It is a language that allows web developers to make all manner of user friendly web items  possible. It allows for a  dynamic and user friendly experience. It handles complex procedures in the online environment such as making live feeds of sports updates and validating user data.

You may be familiar with HTML and CSS. HTML is a markup language. Unlike a markup language which is excellent at organizing elements, Java Script adds a bit more bang for your buck as it is a programming language which means it has more capabilities then HTML.  JavaScript can not only tell the browser how to arrange the web elements, just like HTLM,  but it can interact with the browser in such a way that it is more like a conversation with the browser, rather then just a set of instructions.

As a programming language, JavaScript is based on logic, algorithms and math. Even though this may seem like it is outside the arena of graphic designers, if you want to get into web design, it is important to understand how to implement programming languages such as JavaScript to create awesome functionality to websites.

JavaScript is converted into machine code and interpreted by the web browser. This was initially a major issue in the 1990’s, as each browser interpreted JavaScript differently and some elements would not work properly from one browser to the next. JavaScript requires a browser to convert the script into something workable.

Hopefully this brief overview was helpful in demystifying JavaScript.